perjantai 25. heinäkuuta 2014

1740's stays

I'm back from a little sewing and blogging hiatus I've been having since late March / early April. One of the last things I got finished before the break were these stays. But, for various reasons, I never tried them on until today. I still have a couple of finishing touches to make to the proper mid century shift to go under the stays, but I thought I'd post about them now anyway.

The stays are made from two layers of linen canvas, reproduction 18th century silk brocade / droguet as the top layer and linen lining. They are bound with silk grosgrain (the narrower grosgrain over seams is rayon) and hand sewn with linen thread. They are boned with reed.

They are based on the c. 1740 stays in Norah Waugh's Corsets and crinolines with only the side back seams taken in a little at the waist to fit my shape better.













Construction:

I constructed them my usual way. After outlining the pieces, I quilted the boning channels.




I inserted the boning, secured the edges and whip stitched the seam allowances down. Then I made the lacing holes.



Then I whipped the seams together, made horizontal boning cases from linen tape in the stomacher and then bound the stays.



Lastly I added the lining.



26 kommenttia:

  1. Oh my goodness, those are stunning! I really like the fabric and the contrast stitching too.

    VastaaPoista
  2. Beautiful, as always, Merja! Stunning, really, and they look great on you! Did you bone the straps?

    Best,
    Quinn

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Thank you! Yes I did. I was curious about how it would work but thought I'd do it like the original. Luckily the boning doesn't bother at all when they stays are worn.

      Poista
  3. How does the stomacher stay in and not slide out with wear?

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. The front lacing keeps it very securely in place.

      Poista
  4. Stunning as always! I would so love to be able to see some of your work in person some day.

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Thank you! And who knows, maybe we'll be able to meet some day. :)

      Poista
  5. Amazing! Your work is always so stunning and a huge inspiration for me. This particular creation of yours had made me promise to myself that I'll finish my 18th century sewing projects this fall.

    Interestingly, this 1740 style of stays was actually the first 'corset' I had ever made years ago for a final project in school. Granted mine weren't fully boned and as stunning yours, but they were quite the feat for a beginner. Done in a sky blue satin with gold lacing, they turned out pretty good. I wish I still had them (I used the parts for another project as my skills improved).

    Brava, madame. I too, hope to have the chance to see your work in person someday.
    xoxo
    ~V

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Thank you so much!
      Blue and gold sounds divine. I'd love to meet you too one day. :)

      Poista
  6. Seriously...you are so very inspirational to me! the fact that you hand sewed these stays in and of itself is so incredible! WOW! The fit is exceptional as is the tiny stitching...I am in awe of your patience and talent!! So very well and beautifully done!
    Blessings!
    Gina

    VastaaPoista
  7. Oh I saw your first post on these on your Livejournal blog and I've been wondering when you would update with pics of the final product. I LOVE THESE STAYS! I love that fabric. So very beautiful, and your work never ceases to amaze and inspire me.

    I was wondering if you could explain to me something--you said you outline the pieces of the stays first, and then quilt the boning channels. I attempted to do this too a couple of months ago and then realized that by outlining the stays pieces first, I'd also sewn them closed where the boning channel openings were supposed to be. Does that make sense? How do you deal with that? Do you stitch the outline on the outer fabric only, and then add the linen canvas layers to it only when you're quilting the boning channels?

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Thank you so much! And I apologize for the late answer. It's been a strange year and I've been neglecting my little blog. I sew the outline stitching through all layers and if the stitching is in the way when I'm putting in the boning, I unpick it.

      Poista
  8. I'm wondering. What do you use for boning?

    VastaaPoista
  9. I really love your blog! I can't stop admiring your skills. I sew myself, but have only hoped to sew a historical costume some day. I've loved 1700s for as long as I can remember. You are an inspiration! I wish I could at least see you working with these pieces, I could learn so much :). The main question right now on my mind is that where do you buy the fabrics? Obviously not from Eurokangas :D.

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Thank you so much! And no, not from Eurokangas. :) I bought this silk from durantextiles.com
      I will also recommend renaissancefabrics.net and farmhousefabrics.com

      Poista
  10. I've been making corsets for the first time last month - 19th century, but wish to embark on 18th century stays as I like their line more. One topic that was really important to me was to use a sustainable boning material - steel seems a bit too energy intensive for me, and I do not like using plastic boning either.
    You said you have used REED for these stays? Coud you explain more about those (are they the same used to make baskets?), and maybe show us a photo of what they look like?
    Also I am curious about their ability to bend without breaking.
    Thank you so much for any help on this!

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Yes, it's the same reed you can use for basket weaving. I've never been able to break the flat ones so that's what I mainly use now. The round ones break more easily but I think it's durable enough too.

      Poista
  11. I often read your blog. It's fantastic, you have magic in your hands! Your gowns are fabolulous!
    with your photos I can take a journey through all eras and dreaming to be there!
    Only a question: do you make boned corsets for sale too?
    Thank you very much,
    Beatrice

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Thank you very much!
      Unfortunately I'm not able to make corsets for sale at the moment.

      Poista
  12. Your stays are really beautiful, I love the shape and fabric! I'm planning to realize this 1740s stays too and I hope I can ask you a question because I am a bit confused with the pattern.
    I'm used to late 18th century stays that look shorter than early stays (the top front seems a bit lower on them). But I'm mostly wondering about the waistline.
    On my late 18th century stays, at the side seam the tabs' slits always end at my natural waistline. But on this 1740s stays pattern, at the side seam, the waistline is (maybe 2cm?) lower than my natural waistline.
    As you made those stays: can you confirm that the tabs' slits, and so the corset waistline, are a bit lower than your natural waistline, or are they just on it (and it's me that have a too high natural waistline)?
    That would help me a lot before I cut the pattern and sew stays that fit me but that are too far from the original shape and pattern :)

    Thank you very much,
    Utie

    VastaaPoista
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    VastaaPoista