sunnuntai 26. helmikuuta 2012

c. 1790 mourning round gown, 2012

Ever since looking through Kendra's Europe trip pictures back in 2007, I've been in love with a dress in a painting called The Dauphin Taken Away From His Family, painted by Hauer in 1793. The painting can be found in Musée Carnavalet, but it's very difficult to find a decent quality online picture of it. The best I've found is the very same photo taken by Kendra that made me fall in love with it in the first place. 


My version of the dress is made of black silk taffeta and lined with black linen. It's hand sewn with silk. The pattern and construction are both based on the gown with a front fall opening, c. 1780-90, in Patterns of Fashion. I love the pattern (nicely low cut neckline, a little rising back waistline) and the construction method is my 18th century favorite. Under the dress I'm wearing two linen petticoats and a small rump.


I wanted to create the same look as in the painting, so I got a blond hedgehog style wig to go with the dress for a more glamorous look.















I also wanted to make a large cap for more modest look. The cap is one of the beribboned caps by Country Wives.












I really like the late 1780's and very early 1790's back seam lines.


ETA: a picture in the spirit of the painting.







Construction:

First I sewed the skirt panels together using a running stitch. I used six panels as in the dress the pattern in based of but decided to avoid a center front seam and I placed the cb and cf in the middle of a panel. Then I started the bodice. As I've done it before, I had existing pattern pieces ready. I usually just place the pattern pieces on the fabric and draw around them, but now that the fabric is black and I didn't have any chalk, I pinned the pieces and folded the seam allowances under using the paper edge as a guide. The gap was left so I could sew a line to mark the tuck placement with a bright color thread.


Then, after both silk taffeta and linen layers had folded down seam allowances, it was time to put them on top of each other and sew around the edges with running stitches. I made them in a way that only a little dot shows outside and longer line on the lining side. I sewed the false seams, tucks, with a back stitch. Later I realized that I had turned one side too many on the back pieces where I need to have the seam allowance for the sleeves and straps, but that was an easy fix.


Then I whip stitched all the pieces together.



Then the sleeves. I sewed them up first. The bodice has separate straps. I joined the strap lining and cover on the neckline edge with the point à rabattre sous la main. Then I sewed the linen strap lining on the bodice from both ends. Then I sewed on the sleeve underside from the inside using back stitching. Then I sewed the top sleeve from the outside on the strap lining. Last step was covering the strap lining with the silk and sewing it on from the outside using back stitches.


Then the bodice was almost finished.


Then I turned down the top of the three back panels and whip stitched them in to the bodice. The front panels were treated the same way except I attached them in to a waist tape. 


37 kommenttia:

  1. Beautiful in it's black simplicity!!!
    I love everything about the gown and ensemble (with the wig, fichu and accessoires) - and you've chosen a wonderful place to take the photos!

    Sabine

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Thank you!

      We took the photos in a close by furniture museum. It's so nice that they allow visiting the museum in period clothing.

      Poista
  2. Wow what a beautiful dress and I love the first picture, it's stunning.

    Rachel

    VastaaPoista
  3. This is so beautiful and elegant.

    VastaaPoista
  4. What beautiful work, and you look like you've stepped out of a painting. I don't get to say that very often.

    Can I ask if your hedgehog wig was custom made for you, as I've never seen them online. I'm dreading making mine, but I need to in the next 2 months.

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Thank you!

      The wig was just a long and curly wig that I styled myself. I teased the top and streightened the back re-curling the ends. It was such an agony and I didn't quite get it to look exactly as I had visioned, but I think it's ok.

      Good luck with your wig project! If you are interested in custom wigs, Kendra from demodecouture.com is offering them. http://demodecouture.com/custom-18th-century-wigs/

      Poista
  5. Oh, so simple but lovely! I think you actually look prettier with the cap! Anyhow, which is the museum? When was the house built? It looks like such a neat place to take pictures in!

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Thank you!

      The museum is Tuomarinkylän kartanomuseo. The building was finished in 1790 or a few years earlier. Quite small as a museum, but there were some very nice things like a baroque gaming table. And it's a free entry museum so that's nice too.

      Poista
  6. Your gown is so lovely! I plan to attempt my first historical gown soon and would like to ask a few questions, if I may. I located Janet Arnold's "Patterns of Fashion" in our University library and found the 1780-90 pattern you used. Does your bodice close with hooks and eyes in the front (the pattern shows front lacing)? Did you modify the bodice to accommodate the hooks and eyes? Did you leave the boning in the front strips? Is there boning incorporated anywhere else in your bodice? Are you wearing stays beneath your gown? I have sewn modern dresses and numerous men's pre-1840 clothing articles (drop front pants, shirts, waistcoats, capotes, etc.), but I have never attempted a historical gown. Thank you for any advice you can offer. Again, your dress is just beautiful, and you are beautiful in it!

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Thank you so much!

      The bodice of my dress closes with straight pins. It was a common method of closing 18th century dresses. If you are making a similar edge to edge closing, hooks and eyes work just as well. A little easier to dress, but I find them tedious to sew on so I like pinning my gowns. :)
      I didn't use any boning in the dress, but I'm wearing stays underneath.

      Best of luck for your upcoming project!

      Poista
  7. wow. It looks great as a real lady of the 18th century.
    you have such beautiful dresses and refined. You are my inspiration :)
    I am now neck Polonaise I hope that it will be pretty
    greetings :)

    my blog: www.milianda.pinger.pl.

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Thank you!

      A polonaised back dress is a pretty choice. Good luck for the project!

      Poista
  8. Amazing! Your craftmanship is truly admirable. I am in awe!

    VastaaPoista
  9. Vastaukset
    1. Thank you so much! And thank you also for sharing the pictures!

      Poista
  10. just PERFECT & MEGA WOOOOOWW!!!

    VastaaPoista
  11. Your level of skill is just amazing for being self taught, what a lovely young woman you are and thank you so much for sharing your beautiful clothing.

    VastaaPoista
  12. Hello! congratulatiosn for your work!
    I'm trying to make the exactly same dress, but I don't undertand the scale she (the author) use in the patterns, can you tell me the mesurements of it? Or explain me how to interpret the mesurements? Thanks a lot!

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Thank you very much! And I'm sorry I didn't notice your comment before. In the pattern one square is one inch at each side. I think the original measurements were close to waist being about 25-26 inches and the bust about 35.

      Poista
  13. Okay, I am your fangirl now! ;) You are such a talented seamstress! These gowns and undergarments are exquisite! Okay, I'll stop gushing now. I have a question for you, actually. Can you describe how you feel when you're wearing the gowns? Do you feel as though you know a little of what it was like to live as a woman in the times these gowns were fashionable?

    I've done a little re-enactment myself, in the Elizabethan period at our local Renaissance Faire here in Vermont, but I'm curious, since you've worn so many different styles, if you've noticed the difference in how you hold yourself (or are held by the corsets/stays)?

    Oh, also, who takes all these gorgeous pictures?

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Thank you so much!

      And I do think wearing all the layers brings us a little closer to our foremothers. I especially remember the feeling I got when I, for the first time, spent a week in 18th century lower class clothes and all the different clothing layers and dressing customs started to make true sense and they no longer were just a staged outfit but functional clothing where every piece had it's purpose. And each era is different to wear for sure.

      Behind the camera is my patient husband. :)

      Poista
  14. So, this one is the most beautiful I*'ve ever seen and everything I was looking for.
    The pattern is actually in Janet Arnold's "Patterns of Fashion" or did you make it yourself?
    I just love the neckline, together with the fichu is something I am dreaming about to make for my wedding dress...gosh I love it
    You are really just amazing

    VastaaPoista
  15. Quite lovely! I found some images of the painting here http://www.allposters.com/-sp/The-Dauphin-Taken-from-His-Family-3rd-July-1793-Posters_i1733612_.htm

    VastaaPoista
  16. Hello! I absolutely love your dress! I am interested in buying if at all possible. Please let me know.

    VastaaPoista