torstai 9. toukokuuta 2013

1660's dress

I have always had a fondness for Dutch paintings from the 1650's and the 1660's. My favorite is Ter Borch, but Gabriël Metsu has painted my favorite dress and that became the dress my project was mainly based on. I also found the 1660's bodice pattern and construction notes on the book Seventeenth-Century Women's Dress Patterns: Book 2 extremely useful. The dress is completely hand sewn from duchess silk satin, linen canvas, mid weight linen and a finer white linen using linen and silk threads. I'm wearing it over a shift, a linen petticoat and a rump. I plan on making the appropriate shoes with the square pointy toes and colored stockings soon, but I want to make sure I get my other Costume College dresses done before that. Meanwhile I wore it with my 18th century shoes and stockings.











































And a fun artsy photo taken with a phone application.


Construction:

The panels are two layers of thick and stiff linen. They have seam allowances only where they are joined to other pieces and the seam allowances are folded inside before joining the two sides together. The channels are stitched with a spaced back stitch. The pattern is based on the 1660's bodice in Seventeenth-Century Women's Dress Patterns: Book 2




The panels are whip stitched together and boned with cane, except the two CB bones that needed to be very narrow but durable. I used the spring steel strips from windshield wipers that keep the rubber parts in form. They are only 2 mm wide but durable and bendy. And won't rust.


The project continued by completing the middle layer. The original had all kinds of small fabric pieces scattered around and even paper, but for simplicity I just cut the pieces in same shapes (without seam allowances and tabs) than the boned layer and used only one kind of mid weight linen.  In the picture below I have also already added the silk layer on top of back panels and made the lacing holes.


Then I covered the rest of the bodice with silk. I stab stitched all seams through the boned layer.


Then I bound the neck edge and tried it on.



The I made the wings and the sleeves. The sleeves have an inner layer of linen canvas, doubled in the top half.


They have silk on top and are lined with fine linen. One sleeve cartrige pleated and bound and a finished wing.


The wings are two layers of linen canvas wrapped in silk from the underside.


And then with an added layer on top, stitched from the right side. The underside:


The wings were back stitched to the edge.


And the sleeves whip stitched and back stitched on the bodice. Some time before I had bound the tabs with silk grosgrain and lined them individually.


After whip stitching in the lining, the bodice was finished.



I loved the construction on Kendra's skirt so I pleated and bound the waist the same way. 


There is a small train to the skirt. Otherwise it's just straight panels running stitched together.

44 kommenttia:

  1. Oh my, what a lovely dress! I like mid 1600's fashion too, especially when having such a simple, elegant look as this. I'd be afraid of spilling out of the top though ^_^

    VastaaPoista
  2. I don't like baroque gowns, but your is so wonderful! You look gorgeous! My best friend said that your gowns are only which look like authentic historical gowns! :)

    VastaaPoista
  3. Great dress! You're so talented :D

    modemanifest.blogspot.com

    VastaaPoista
  4. omg! I wonder if you sell these ?

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Thank you! Unfortunately I only have time to sew for myself at the moment.

      Poista
  5. It's gorgeous!!! I wish I were as taltented as you :)

    VastaaPoista
  6. Jaw-droppingly gorgeous work! Somehow I think you look like Snow White :) Baroque gowns are so elegant; I especially love the narrow back vs. off-the-shoulders neckline combination.

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Thank you very much! I love the backs the most too when it comes to Baroque gowns.

      Poista
  7. Your artistry absolutely astounds me...you are an inspiration. Well done, once again. Thank you for posting construction pictures.

    VastaaPoista
  8. OMG I'm having the worst fangirl moment hearing you're going to be at Costume College...I'm in awe of your work! Just beautiful!

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Thank you! Will we be meting at Costume College then? :)

      Poista
  9. Lovely! I have wanted to make a gown of this period for some time. Yours turned out beautifully as always! The grey is a very nice color on you as well.

    VastaaPoista
  10. The gown looks amazing! The colour is beautiful! Amazing work!

    VastaaPoista
  11. This is the most beautiful 17thc. gown I have ever seen. The fabric is classy and elegant...Perfection! You do such exquisite work. I certainly wish this gown were mine!
    Bravo, Madam!
    Mary
    http://anhistoricallady.blogspot.com

    VastaaPoista
  12. This is truly gorgeous. You look like you stepped right out of a painting!

    VastaaPoista
  13. Actually this is my first encounter with the 17th century, as I've never paid much attention to this era - ha, but you've simply conquered the Baroque! Your dress looks amazing: in one way modest/simple and then truly regal. But what fascinates me the most is how the dress changed your silhouette - you do look baroquesque! (Is that really a term?!)
    Thanks very much for showing the detailed construction. Yet I wonder, wether this kind of dress is comfortable or have you been happy to step out of it after taking the photos?
    Thanks for sharing!
    Sabine

    VastaaPoista
    Vastaukset
    1. Thank you very much! And it does make me look very different!

      It's quite comfortable, but for my body type, the lack of flare in the lower back isn't ideal and the spot just above the tabs can begin to press too much if worn for long period of time because of the severe change in angle and pressure between the edge and the tabs concentrated in such a small area.

      I found that the familiar "Baroque stoop" from many paintings, where you stand with your hips forward, takes the pressure away. I wonder if it was just a fashionable pose to be painted in or the most comfortable way to carry the gown to many women back then too.

      http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/75/Gerard_ter_Borch_%28II%29_-_Curiosity_-_WGA22128.jpg

      http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f4/Gerard_ter_Borch_%28II%29_-_Woman_Reading_a_Letter_-_WGA22139.jpg

      http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gerard_ter_Borch_(II)_-_Paternal_Admonition_(detail)_-_WGA22112.jpg

      Poista
  14. You look amazing, ideal, very very feminine:) Excellent handwork, just gorgeous!

    VastaaPoista
  15. Your creatations are just stunning! I've really enjoyed reading your blog. I've nominated you for the Liebster Blog Award! http://vintagevisions27.blogspot.com/2013/05/liebster-blog-award.html
    -Emily

    VastaaPoista
  16. Another gorgeous dress.So beautifully constructed.
    Breathtaking.

    VastaaPoista
  17. I'm just about to start making a 17th century gown. Thanks so much for sharing the process, I've picked up some really helpful tips! :)

    VastaaPoista
  18. This is so incredibly beautiful! I have not seen very much reproduction Baroque clothing, you have executed it wonderfully. I am pinning to Pinterest for future reference! Thanks so much for posting construction photos, they are so helpful.

    VastaaPoista
  19. HOw beautiful how talented U r wonderful sewer U r

    VastaaPoista
  20. This dress is beautiful! But is it normal that the boobs come out so much? Because it can be "too much" to stand for a man.

    VastaaPoista
  21. Amazing, and beautiful work! I love your creations! Like looking through a timeglass...now if I could only find it in my size as a costume.

    VastaaPoista